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Gift Boxes

We survived the Valentine's Day, our favorite day of the year - it was exciting and full of adrenaline and now are ready to work on a new collection. 

Meanwhile we are very proud that gift boxes were very well received by our clients. We will definitely come up to more of these. If you have any suggestions or recommendations, please let us know. We are always very glad to hear from you!

Spring is coming with more surprises - stay tuned !

 

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JADE PLANT

Crassula ovata

This low maintenance, long-lasting succulent looks like a tiny tree and is said to bring good fortune. It can produce flowers in winter.

HOW NOT TO KILL IT

Location –  position the plant on a sunny windowsill that is 50-75F (18-24C). It will tolerate periods at 50F (10C) in winter.

Light – Provide bright, dappled sunlight.

Watering + feeding -  Water moderately; let the top 1in (2-3cm) of potting mix dry out between waterings.  Water more sparingly in winter. Feed once in spring and then again in summer.

Care – Pull off any old, shriveled leaves. In spring, lightly prune the plant to shape. Plant in a weighty pot as it can become top-heavy and topple over.

YELLOWING LEAVES?
This is probably due to overwatering.

SAVE IT – Allow the potting mix to dry out and check that the pot is well drained.

DROPPING LEAVES?
Older leaves will shrivel and fall off naturally, but younger leaves may drop under environmental stress (such as being moved to bright sunlight suddenly, or over- or underwatering).

SAVE IT – Give water if the potting mix is very dry, or allow it to dry out of soggy. When repositioning, move your plant gradually toward the desired spot over a week, to allow it to acclimate.

SHRIVELED LEAVES AND STEMS?
Your plant is short of water.

SAVE IT – Give your plant a small amount of water daily over the course of a few days – the leaves should soon plump up again. Don’t let t stand in soggy potting mix.

LEGGY PLANT?
Your plant needs more sunlight

SAVE IT – Move it to a sunnier spot

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CLIVIA

Clivia miniate

Clivias are native to South Africa and produce a beautiful, single, red, orange, or yellow flower in early spring.

HOW NOT TO KILL IT

Location – From spring to late fall, keep the plant in a heated room. In winter, move it to a room that is 50F (10C) for 3 months to rest – this will help initiate a flower bud. Then return it to its spring-to-fall position.

Light – Provide bright, but indirect light.

Watering + Feeding – From spring to late fall, keep the potting mix moist. Reduce watering in winter so that the mix is almost dry. Feed once a month from spring to fall, and not at all during winter.

Care – Wipe the leaves occasionally. Don’t move the pot when the plant is flowering or in a bud. After flowering, cut off the dead flower spike at the base. The plant may produce a second flower in late summer. Clivias like to be snug, so repot the plant after flowering only if the roots are bursting out of the pot.

BLEACHED OR BROWN ON THE LEAVES?
The leaves are sunburned.

BROWN LEAVES AT THE BASE OF YOUR PLANT?
This happens when the older leaves are dying back.

SAVE IT
This is normal. Just gently pull away any brown leaves.

YELLOW LEAVES?
This could be due to underfeeding, or under- or overwatering.

SAVE IT
Make sure you are using the correct watering and feeding regimen for the season

SHORT FLOWER SPIKE? NO FLOWER IN SPRING?
This is most likely due to a lack of rest in winter, but it could be because the pot is too large, or because your plant was underwatered after being rested.

SAVE IT
It has been rested, make sure you keep the potting mix moist. Check that the pot is not too big – the root ball should only be 1in (2-3cm) away from the edge of the pot.

 

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MUM

Chrysanthemum

Blooms come in many colors and last for several weeks. Chose plants with both open flowers and opening buds.

HOW NOT TO KILL IT

Location – Keep the plant at 50-60F (10-15C), as the flowers will last longer. A windowsill in a cool room is ideal.

Light – Provide bright, indirect light; keep it out of direct sun.

Watering + Feeding – A mum likes water, so keep the potting mix moist (but not soggy) at all times. You could feed the plant after a few weeks. It won't flower for long enough to need feeding a second time.

Care – Deadhead any spent flowers. Plants are often discarded after flowering, but you could try planting yours in your garden. It will have been treated with dwarfing hormones before it was sold, but should revert to its normal growth habit outdoors, and may flower in fall.

WILTING LEAVES?
The plant needs watering.

SAVE IT – Water your plant and ensure that you are keeping the potting mix moist, but not soggy

FLOWERS NOT LASTING?
Higher temperature will make the flowers open more rapidly and fade more quickly.

SAVE IT - Move it to a cooler spot that is 50-60F (10-15C)

FUZZY GRAU MOLD ON THE FOLIAGE?

This gray mold is called botrytis and may have been caused by your plant sitting in its cellophane wrapping for a long time.

SAVE IT – Remove any affected areas and treat with a fungicide.

BUDS WON'T OPEN?
The plant may not be getting enough light. If the buds are completely green, they may not open.

SAVE IT – Move your plant to a brighter spot.

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SPIDER PLANT

Chlorophytum comosum

Spider plants are ideal for beginners because they are very easy to care for. Display them in a hanging planter.

HOW NOT TO KILL IT

Location – Keep the plant in a room that is always 45 – 75F (7-24C)

Light – Place it in a bright spot, away from direct sunlight.

Watering + Feeding – Keep the potting mix moist, but not soggy. Water more sparingly in water. Feed every few weeks excepts during water.

Care – Repot young plants into a slightly bigger pot every spring. Repot mature plants when the white, fleshy roots begin to push the plant from its container, making it tricky to water. Mature spider plants produce “plantlets” or babies that can be cut off and grown individually. If they have tiny roots, plant them directly into the new potting mix. If they have no roots, place them in water for a few weeks until the roots appear.

BROWN TIPS ON THE LEAVES?
Your plant can tolerate the hot, dry air of centrally heated rooms, but this may make the leaf tips go brown. Underfeeding or underwatering can have the same effect.

SAVE IT – Cut off the brown TIPS AND MOVE YOUR PLANT TO A COOLER ROOM. Make sure you feed and water it regularly.

BROWN STREAKS ON THE LEAVES IN WINTER?
This means your plant has been watered too much in cool conditions.

SAVE IT – Remove any unsightly leaves. Make sure that you water your plant less during winter – the potting mix should be just moist.

YELLOW LEAVES?
The soil around the roots is too dry, which might mean your plant needs repotting. Alternatively, it may have root rot.

SAVE IT – Remove any unsightly leaves. Water well from spring to fall. Repot your plant if it is building from its pot. Check for root rot.

PALE LEAVES? Harsh sunlight, lack of water, or low sunlight and low temperatures in winter can all make the leaves turn pale.

SAVE IT – Move the plant out of direct sunlight, and water well. In winter, move your plant to a warmer, brighter room.

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PEACOCK PLANT

Calathea

Most peacock plants are grown for their leaves. Calathea roseopicta leaves have red undersides.

HOW NOT TO KILL IT

LocationIt is a rainforest plant, so keep it in a warm room (60-68F / 16-20C). It needs humidity, so a bathroom can be ideal. Avoid rooms with sudden temperature fluctuations.

Light – Put it in partial shade or bright light. Keep It away from direct sun.

Watering + Feeding – From spring to fall, keep the potting mix (but not wet) at all times. Use distilled, filtered, or rainwater as these plants are sensitive to chemicals added to tap water. Make sure the pot drains well. Water more sparingly in winter. Feed once in spring, summer, and fall.

Care – To maintain humidity, set it on a pebble-filled tray of water, and mist daily. Grouping with other plants will also improve humidity. Wipe the leaves occasionally to keep them free of dust. Repot in spring.

DROOPY LEAVES?
This could be a sign of overwatering. Alternatively, your plant may be too cold or exposed to drafts.

SAVE IT – The potting mix should be moist, but not wet. Water sparingly in winter. Try moving your plant to a warmer, sheltered spot.

LEAF TIPS OR EDGES BROWN?
The air is probably too dry, you may have overfed your plant, or it may have overfed your plant, or it may be due to watering with hard water.

SAVE IT – Mist your plant daily and place it on a pebble-filled tray of water. Group it with other plants to distilled, filtered, or rainwater.

FADED OR SCORCHED LEAVES?
Your plant has probably been in direct sunlight

SAVE IT – Move it to a shadier place.

 

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QUEENS TEAR

Billbergia nutans

This is one of the easiest bromeliads to grow. Try displaying queen’s tears in a hanging planter.

HOW NOT TO KILL IT

Location – Keep the plant in a room that is 41-75F (5-24C). It will only flower if at the upper end of this range.

Light – Place in bright, but indirect light.

Watering + feeding – Water the vase ( the center of the rosette of leaves) with distilled, filtered, or rainwater, ensuring that the water is always 1in (2-3cm) deep. Empty and refill the vase every 2-3 weeks to prevent the water from stagnating. Keep the potting mix just moist. Feed once a month in spring and summer by adding half-strength liquid fertilizer to the central vase.

Care – Place the plant on a pebble-filled tray of water for humidity. It will flower at around 3 years old. Gently pull faded flowers away. Repot after flowering in spring. It will produce “pups” (new plants at the base), dying slowly in the process. Repot pups when they are one-third the size of the parent.

LEAF TIPS TURNING YELLOW?
Yellow plant has probably outgrown its container.

SAVEIT – Repot your plant in spring, after it has flowered.

BROWN LEAF TIPS?
This could be due to dry air, or watering with hard water.

SAVE IT – Mist the leaves regularly, if warm. Switch to distilled, filtered, or rainwater.

DRIPPING FLOWERS?
This is nectar, which drips from the flowers when they are moved or touched – hence Billbergia’s common name, queen’s tears.

SAVE IT – Do nothing

NO FLOWERS?
Your plant wont flower until its around 3 years old. If you have a mature plant, the temperature may be too low or it may be in too dark a spot.

SAVE IT – Move it to a warmer spot in a bright position. Avoid placing it in direct sunlight.

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PAINTED-LEAF BEGONIA

Begonia rex

There are many varieties of painted-leaf begonia that have beautiful foliage in shades of crimson, silver, purple, green, and red.

HOW NOT TO KILL IT

Location – Ideally, keep the plant around 64-70F (18-21C) all year around, but don’t let it get any hotter. It can survive at 55F (13C) in winter, but no colder.

Light – Place it in good, but indirect light. Avoid direct sun, which can burn the leaves.

Watering + Feeding  - Water so the potting mix is moist, but allow it to dry out a little in between waterings during summer. It is best watered from below to stop water from accumulating at the base of the stems. Keep just moist in winter.

Care – repot if needed in spring. Turn the pot regularly to make sure the plant grows evenly. Make sure it has good ventilation.

WHITE POWDER ON THE LEAVES?
This is powdery mildew, often due to drought or too much heat, humid conditions, or poor air circulation.

SAVE IT – Remove the affected leaves and treat with fungicide.

YELLOWING LEAVES?
These could be due to too much or too little water, or not enough light.

SAVE IT – Check your plants care regimen and position

GRAY FLUFF ON PARTS OF THE PLANT?
This is gray mold (botrytis), due to cool, damp, crowded conditions, or water splashing onto the leaves.

SAVE IT – Move the plant away from other begonias to stop the infection spreading and improve ventilation. Remove any affected areas and treat with fungicide.

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EMERALD FERN

EMERALD FERN

Asparagus densiflours Sprengeri Group

 

Not actually a fern, but a member of the lily family, this easy – care plant has graceful, feathery foliage.

HOWNOT TO KILL IT

Location – Place the plant in a coolish room (45-70F / 7-21C), away from direct heat, such a heat register. It likes some humidity, so does well grouped with other plants. It’s a good choice for a bathroom.

Light – Ideally, provide bright, indirect light.

Watering + Feeding – Water when the top 1in ( 2-3cm) of potting mix has dried out . Don’t let the mix dry out completely, or allow it to become waterlogged, Reduce watering in winter. Feed monthly in spring and summer.

Care – In winter, mist the leaves occasionally if the room is centrally heated. Cut away any yellowing stems at the base. Repot the plant in spring if the root ball comes into contact with the edge of the pot.

YELLOW FOLIAGE?
Older foliage at the bottom of the plant will yellow naturally. If yellowing elsewhere, the room temperature may be too high, there may be too much light, or your plant may be under- or overwatered. Make sure that the potting mix is not waterlogged, which leads to root rot.

SAVE ITMove it away from a heat register or to a cooler room, and place it in a slightly shadier spot. Allow the mix to dry out if it is waterlogged and make sure let the top 1in (2-3cm) dry out between waterings. Check for root rot.

BROWN EDGES ON THE LEAVES?
Your plant has had too much sun, or the potting mix has dried out.

SAVE ITMove it to a shadier spot. Water, letting any excess drain away.

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ANTHURIUM

ANTHURIUM

Also called flamingo flower, this easy-to-grow houseplants has wavy, exotic, brightly colored flowers (spathes) that can last for weeks.

HOW TO NOT KILL IT

Location – An anthurium is a tropical plant, so it needs warmth and humidity. Place the plant in warm room (60-68F / 15-20C) and away from drafts.

Light - Position it in bright light, but out of direct sun, about 3ft (1m) or so away from a sunny window.

Watering + feeding – Water moderately from spring to fall, whenever the soil surface feels dry. After watering, the potting mix should feel moist, but not soggy. Water less in winter. Feed monthly in spring and summer.

Care – To provide humidity, mist the leaves regularly (avoid the flowers) or set the plant on a pebble filled tray of water. Clean the leaves frequently with a damp sponge, and gently pull of spent flowers. Repot in spring into a slightly larger pot.

LEAF TIPS TURNING BROWN?
The air isn’t humid enough or your plant has too much direct sunlight – the leaves can burn easily.

SAVE IT – Increase humidity by misting the leaves regularly, or place the pot on a pebble-filled tray of water. Move to a bright spot that is out of direct sunlight.

LOTS OF LEAVES BUT NO FLOWERS?



Your plant may not be getting enough sunlight, it might be in too large a pot, or it may be underfed.

SAVE IT - Move it to brighter spot. Repot it in a smaller pot if there than ½ - ¾ in (1-2cm) between the edge of the pot and the root ball. Feed once a month to encourage flowering.

YELLOWING LEAVES?
This could be due to too much watering or overfeeding.

SAVE IT – Don’t allow your plant to sit in water, and only water again when the stop of the potting mix is dry. If necessary, stop feeding it for a month or two.

 

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